Shore Acres State Park and the Darlingtonia State Natural Site

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The last night of my trip was spent at another yurt, but this time it was located in Sunset Beach State Park just outside of Coos Bay, Oregon. This is an amazing part of the state just south of our huge sand dunes. I didn’t have the time to visit them at length during this trip, but driving past them brought back memories from when I was a child. I’d also forgotten that once again, it is another unique environment with more unique plants so I will certainly return again soon.
In a way, I was kind of sad my adventure was over. I’ve been chronically ill for ten years and it was a relief to get out and travel at my own pace with all of the necessary comforts and without any kind of static from upsetting or worrying others. Illness triggers things in all of us in different ways and it is often the elephant in the room. Chronically ill people don’t like to be alone too much though, and we really hate to be told that we should hang out with other people like us so that we can find others who understand. Isolating all of us together can just hurt more. Anyone can understand what we are going through—if they want to do so. Many do not want to consider the time when they too will be faced with a health difficulty, but it will happen, and when it does, it will help a lot to have a friend who can help.
The trip has led me to make three resolutions for the upcoming summer months concerning how to keep healthy so that I can live in my garden and hunt plants from time to time in the woods or wherever:
  1. Ask for help when I need help and no more new projects so that I can finish whatever I’ve already started. I usually stop because I get to the point where I need help and then I won’t ask.
  2. Simplify my life and my home.
  3. Remember to have fun and to enjoy all of my friends while sticking to the activities that have always been essential to me. Even if my own life has changed, none of my friends will be upset for me so long as I remain who I’ve always been. We all return to comfort foods, and we all know who our comfort friends are, right?


Before I left for the day’s adventures I found these little beauties beside the car. The one on the left is another twinberry and the one on the right is native salal.

Twinberry bloom.
That last day was much drier than the one before but it was still cool and windy. I jumped into the car and headed out to see the views that I’d remembered as having been so beautiful.
I was so pleased that I’d chosen to go and as my eyes took all of this in for about an hour or so, my body was filled with a kind of pleasure that only the experience of art can replicate but it is always stunted by the surroundings of a museum and the disruptions of others’ gazes. Nothing interfered with my experience that last day and I took it all in for as long as I was able to do so.
My love of Romanticism is showing through, as this most obviously is a manifestation of my complete understanding and acceptance of the Sublime. I think that my trip to see what has always inspired me, was a complete success since I feel recharged and so much more calm now. I hope to return to this idea more and more in the future when it comes to discussing garden and landscape design and if I am well enough, I would like to really dig in to some great critical theory as applied to gardens.
Near the end of the road are the remains of an old estate built by a lumberman who’d made a fortune in the timber industry. Today it is Shore Acres State Park.

The home that once stood on the site burned down years ago but the estate garden remains and that is what attracts visitors to the park. Where the home once stood, there is now an information building and shelter that can be used as a shelter for whale watching during rough weather.

Can you imagine having a patio like this one beside the ocean? Those urns are amazing and the crashing waves incredible! It must have been a lovely home. I wish I had a patio with a view like!
Shore Acres Gardens
Don’t you just love the Giant Dracaena?
Hebe bloom.
Well-clipped Azalea x’Hino-Crimson’.
Garden Pavilion for weddings and concerts.
Azalea with the original gardener’s quarters in the background.
Entrance to the Asian garden and pond.
Close up of Berberis darwinii.
Garden gateway to cliff overlook and private beach below.
View looking back toward the entrance from the garden gateway to the ocean.
Some kind of hardy Heliotrope?
View looking back toward the entrance from the Asian garden.
Species Rhododendron. Not sure which.
Sorry for the blurry photo but I loved that this planter was so simply planted with only a Lamium.
This is a very interesting and simple water feature.
The much loved Monkey-puzzle Tree (Araucaria araucana).
Returning to the entrance.
Guest services and gift shop building that was added later. Its architecture really adds to the experience.
I seriously applaud all of the work that has gone into keeping the park open to the public. It is a treasure and I recommend that everyone visit it if they happen to visit the area.
Darlingtonia State Natural Site
Just north of the coastal town of Florence, Oregon sits a tiny little park. To get there from Coos Bay it takes about an hour and a half by car. Little did I know that again, my day would brighten even more with the kind of experience that you don’t get often when you are delighted by a sight and a child-like happiness lingering in your heart’s passageways just bursts out shocking you to discover you’re still able to feel that way. It is good to be reminded of that from time to time.
Here is more information about the Darlingtonia Wayside with information about how to get there.

The short walk to the bog was full of the typical forest imagery yet it was all made more beautiful that day by the rain and the light. Bright green moss clung to everything, and the skunk cabbage stink was working its magic with the bugs. The forest world was as it should be…

And then the magic hit me and I was seriously in awe. This was so incredible—even if the plants were not necessarily at their best.
Don’t you just want to make snake noises? Ssssssssssss. Sssssssssssssssss. Ssssssssssssssssssssss.

I hope to return to this site a bit later this year so that I can catch them in bloom.

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So, this is the last post from the trip. Though I have been home for awhile now, the posts have had to go on. I am still so grateful that I was well enough to travel on my own for a few days but I have paid heavily for the vacation and I am still not quite recovered. Believe it or not, my right calf is swollen from pressing on the gas petal. Stupid swelling problems that just get sillier and sillier.

The many seeds and seedlings I have cannot wait any longer, and I have to plant my new Burpee ‘Black Cat’ Petunias. I don’t usually fall prey to special new introductions named to make me crave them, but I totally fell for this one. They really are black and I am happy I spent a bit extra for them.

5 thoughts on “Shore Acres State Park and the Darlingtonia State Natural Site

  1. What a trip! Such enchanted gardens and amazing plants. I can't even begin to tell you what I like the best. I hope to be able to see these places some day. So glad you had a good time. I love the yurts. Never thought of being able to stay in one while traveling. Sounds like you also found some peace of mind and are recharged for sure. Take care, recover and enjoy life all you can.
    P. S. I like this font you chose for your post.

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  2. Thanks so much! The old font was hard for me to read so I thought it was silly to expect anyone else to read it.

    I really adore the yurts and it is wonderful you can reserve any of them online. You can also rent the old fire lookouts, and I've done that in the past, but driving to a mountaintop can be kind of rough. Those are online to rent too.

    Maybe that should be my late summer trip?

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  3. Such beautiful photos. Thank you so much for sharing them. The gardens at Shore Acres have really matured since my last visit, which was about 45 years ago. About Sunset Beach, it was one of my favorite places for our family to camp (also getting on towards 50 years ago) because of an inlet that was perfect for inner tubes. I think the yurts are a really good idea because one of my less happy recollections in the campground there was when our heavy canvas tent collapsed on us in the rain in the middle of the night. Your post brings back memories for me, mostly fond 😉

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  4. Patricia,
    How amazing that place must have been back then! I too found it magical as a child but I never camped with my parents because my mother wouldn't allow that sort of thing. Funny how much I craved it. The inlet you mentioned is still right there and I can see why you would have floated around in it. I watched a man surf on a paddle board for about an hour in that location and that was fascinating.

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