Golf Course Garden Inspiration

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OK, so if you didn’t know this, we live and garden at the base of an extinct volcano (Mt Tabor) in the city of Portland, Oregon. This volcano of ours is a cinder cone, and at its top we have trails, a park, and picnic areas—among a variety of other cool things. From the swings, for instance, on a clear day, you can see Mt St Helen’s.

Mt St Helen’s as seen from the street above our house.

The foster kids love to be on the volcano, looking at the other volcano, but as cool as it is, when I need to walk now, I actually drive a few miles away from my home to an amazing exercise trail that encircles what I would consider to be a well-designed golf course—though I am far from an expert! Call me crazy, since I have this amazing neighborhood of bungalows to wander around, but something tells me I like the trail not only because I was a runner in my youth—and I enjoy being around others who can still do this activity—but it is due to something else. Big surprise that the main impetuses for me are the non-stop native plants and amazing vistas!! (Oh, and this trail is heavily used so I feel far more safe—sort of…)

If every golf course looked as good as Glendoveer, I might consider taking up golfing, but for me, gardening will always be my sport and I cannot afford another. In the meantime, I will simply enjoy what this fine course has to offer from my trail on the outside of its splendor.

View of the East Course.
Though not native, this is a highlight of the walk all summer long. They have a very long fence covered with hardy Passion Vines.
I admit it! I snag these for seed saving and seed germination experimentation.
Our native shrub Oceanspray or Holodiscus discolor.

On the Web site it says that John Stenzel redesigned the East Course in 1928 when the West Course was added. I couldn’t find any information about this man, but I would like to know more about him since he did such an amazing job as not only a golf course designer, but as a landscape architect as well.

Native Vine Maple (Acer circinatum) under the mostly Douglas Fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) canopy.
Native Thimbleberry (Rubus parviflorus).
Native Snowberry (Symphoricarpos albus). I love to collect these inedible berries too.  I always remember for some reason that this plant was written about by Lewis and Clark in their journals. Maybe it was because specimens collected and propagated ended up at Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello and he wrote that he thought the berries were some of the most beautiful he had ever seen. He then forwarded cuttings to his friend Madame Noailles de Tessé in Paris. This may explain why I love the plant since the history of its propagation can be traced, and in my world, all roads lead back to France for some reason.
To the left of this is the golf course. Well designed, isn’t it?

Happy trails to you, and just out of curiosity, where do you find gardening inspiration in your daily routine that takes you to places away from your garden? I am so spoiled with parks and recreational and/or natural areas that I truly take for granted the beautiful scenery I live in! Do you feel like you do that too?

Here is a link to the nature trail provided by our elected regional government METRO,
http://www.metro-region.org/index.cfm/go/by.web/id=158

Here is a link to the Glendoveer Golf Course, est. 1927,
http://www.golfglendoveer.com/rkonly.asp?HID=591

Amazing slug and snail hunters out for a walk too.

5 thoughts on “Golf Course Garden Inspiration

  1. It is great to meet a blogger from Portland! I live on the far opposite end of the country (Alabama), but one of my sons live in Portland, not very far from Mt.Tabor. He has carried us all over your wonderful city, and the view from the top of Mt. Tabor was a highlight. However, we missed the great trail around the golf course! It is certainly beautiful, and I can see why you enjoy it. Yes, it's easy to overlook wonders in our own backyards. The grass on the other side always seems a bit more exotic!

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  2. Hi Ficurinia, this is my first visit to your blog, and I lo-o-ove it! That is the most beautiful golf course I have ever seen. Thanks for sharing. I don't feel I live in beautiful scenery so I extra appreciate you sharing yours. cheers, catmint

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  3. I love golf courses for the design, Same with cemeteries. They are designed by architects that have specialized in these type of design. One thing about both, they are good examples of great tree siting. They always use a large variety of trees and the trees are allowed to gain full and glorious size.

    You do live in a beautiful place.I have never been to Portland but have seen many beautiful photos in Oregon.Thanks for the tour.

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  4. Hello Ficurinia,
    My sport is to go to my garden and look my plant growing day by day.
    My sport is to go to my garden and look the insect work.
    Nice post.
    You must have a good soil, because I know those who live near of a volcano have a nice garden.

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